Book Publicity Tips

How to set up Google and Twitter alerts

By Sandra Beckwith
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How “alert” are you about your book and its topic online? Are you using Google and Twitter alerts to monitor what people are saying and to contribute to the conversation? To make it easy for you to get going with alerts, I’ve created a special report offering step-by-step instructions for creating the necessary free accounts for Google and Twitter and for Twitter alert services Twilert and Tweetbeep, too. Download the report... then start making connections! Download full report (PDF)»
 

How to write a tip sheet

By Sandra Beckwith
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A tip sheet is a news release that offers tips or advice in a bulleted or numbered format. It’s one of the hardest working and most useful tactics available for generating publicity. Use a tip sheet to generate short column notes in a newspaper or magazine or to interest a reporter, editor, or producer in a feature article or talk show interview on the tip sheet topic. Here’s how to create an effective tip sheet. Read full article »
 

6 surefire ways to promote your novel

By Sandra Beckwith
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The biggest mistake most novelists make when promoting their books is believing that it’s all about book reviews. Wrong. Book reviews are valuable and securing them should be on any author or publisher’s book promotion to-do list, but your novel deserves more widespread, long-term, and ongoing exposure than it can get through reviews alone. It deserves to be talked about month after month – as long as the book is available for purchase. Here are six tips for helping you see the publicity and promotion value in your fiction so that you generate the ongoing buzz your book deserves... Read full article »
 

5 tips for writing a book announcement news release
that will get used by the press

By Sandra Beckwith
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A book announcement press release helps us tell the world our new book is available for purchase. It’s often sent to the media with a copy of the book or a note asking if the journalist would like to receive a complimentary review copy. It’s also included in the book’s press kit. It’s not the only media relations tool you’ll want to use to generate book buzz, but it’s an essential resource when your goal is to tell the media outlets read, watched, or listened to by your book’s target audience that there’s a new book they’ll want to know about. Read full article »
 

12 ways to keep your nonfiction book in the news

By Sandra Beckwith
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Publishers are willing to publicize nonfiction books when they’re released, but they rarely do much after the launch to keep books in the news, even though most deserve ongoing media exposure. Here are some easy things you can do to generate continuing publicity for your title. Use a mix of these ideas to develop a 12-month publicity plan that will provide the support your book needs. Read full article »
 

Get paid to promote your book!

By Sandra Beckwith
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Most authors spend money to promote their books, but some get paid to do it. They’re media spokespersons, hired by companies and organizations to add credibility to a consumer product or service being promoted through a publicity campaign. They are topic experts who have the credentials to back their expertise. And they are paid $2,000 to $3,000 per day to help a company meet its communications objectives by sharing key message points through media interviews, while receiving impressive free media exposure for their books. Read full article »